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Firebird Review: Fierce, Stirring Russian Romance Elevated By Electric Leads

Phoenix A calm and thrilling portrait of intricate passion. Writer / Director Peeter Rebane (Tashi Derek!) I have a great job translating the Russian story of Sergei Fetisov into an English historical drama. Performance by co-author Tom Pryor (Kingsman: The Secret Service) And Oleg Zagorodnii (who are youThe movie is a real accomplice because he sings when they are alone. This movie is a drama about two men separated by Russian law, but there are some shots of fighters. Phoenix.. From a technical point of view, the film has a bright shine. But especially for performing arts and music. The area does not exceed expectations. Phoenix It starts slowly, but the very obvious love between the protagonists captivates the audience from start to finish.

Sergei (former) and Rome (Zagorodney) were drawn into the Russian army in the 1970s when homosexuality was banned. There are two things between their love. The Roman relationship with his girlfriend Luisa (Diana Pozarskaya) is the best who has decided to reveal the truth and face the most severe punishment. The two men share intense sexual arousal, albeit short, which is still based on Roman language. Eventually, Sergei leaves the army and goes to drama school. Since Sergei is accustomed to himself, Rome is considering marrying Luisa just to save Sergei from criminal punishment. Russian military installations are still trying to portray them as homosexuals when time and new revelations begin to violate their ability to associate.

Praia and Zagorodney are electric. In other words, movies wouldn’t work without them. Previously, a slightly shorter but much more confident blonde, the more masculine presenter Zagorodnii, who lives 24/7 with the greatest fear, works their magic as a duo. From nostalgic looks to perfect relationships, the dynamics of a stage partner never stop. Zagorodnii is impressive in his selfish scene, while protecting him from the serious consequences of his relationship with Sergei. In one scene, he learns almost everything and essentially doesn’t talk while searching for a home. She uses only her eyes to create a sense of fear that reminds her of both what she is experiencing now and the story behind her situation. Prior, on the other hand, is bold and candid when talking to Zagorodnii. In the final supper scene of the movie, he gives a questionable answer to a simple question with a moving, tear-filled restraint.

Both leaders are born talents, but Rebane is also shining in this area, making the most of his performance. Whether it’s a big role or a small role, everyone is on the same page in Firebird. That may be true of the essence of the story, but there is nothing out of place in this portrayal of Russia in the 1970s. Similarly, there is no painstaking effort to mention the invention of the Beatles and microwave ovens as a way to reach the audience. The movie starts. Rebane relies on a viewer who always knows where to point the camera. Most excitingly, as Romans fly jets, Firebird boasts some great pictures of them taking off. Mixing CGI with a real plane was a genius. However, using leads to cut two squirts in the sex scene is a stereotypical borderline in such a good movie.

Firebird is more interesting than the average Russian historical drama and more subtle than the average LGBTQ romance. The depiction of each character is well thought out and implemented. It feels like the whole production is in sync with this. The movie is dragged in early, but other than that, there isn’t much dissatisfaction. There are plenty of scores left on the table and the design of the set isn’t perfect, but Firebird doesn’t suffer from the lack of gorgeous cinematography. He likes it to be a movie about two guys trying to stay in love. Movies that know what it is and what it wants to be are not necessarily the same, but the vision offered by Firebird is harmony and elegance.

Phoenix From April 29th in theaters and on demand. The film is 107 minutes long and is rated R for language and some sexual content.

Our rating:

3 out of 5 (good)


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Firebird Review: Fierce, Stirring Russian Romance Elevated By Electric Leads

Firebird is a calm yet stirring portrait of complex passions. Writer-director Peeter Rebane (Tashi Delek!) does an excellent job translating Sergey Fetisov’s Russian story into an English language period piece. The performances by co-writer Tom Prior (Kingsman: The Secret Service) and Oleg Zagorodnii (Who Are You) are the real draw, as the movie sings anytime they are alone. Though the film is a drama about two men separated by Russian law, there are several shots of fighter jets that amplify Firebird. From a technical standpoint, the film has flashes of brilliance. But for the most part, it does not exceed expectations in the areas of set design, music, etc. Firebird starts slow, but the fiercely tangible love between the leads keeps its grip on the audience throughout.
Sergey (Prior) and Roman (Zagorodnii) are both enlisted in the military in 1970s Russia, a time when homosexuality is expressly forbidden. Two things stand between their love: A higher up, bent on revealing their truth and seeing the harshest punishment dealt out, and Roman’s relationship with his girlfriend Luisa (Diana Pozharskaya). Though the two men share an intense, albeit short, sexual awakening, it’s always on Roman’s terms. Eventually, Sergey leaves the armed forces for drama school. As Sergey becomes more comfortable in his own skin, Roman contemplates marrying Luisa just to save Sergey from criminal punishment. As time and new revelations begin to encroach on their ability to be around one another, the Russian military complex is still pushing to out them as gay.
Prior and Zagorodnii are electric. Simply put, the film does not work without them. Prior, the slightly smaller but much more confident blonde, and Zagorodnii, the more masculine-presenting man that lives 24/7 inside his worst fear, work their magic as a duo. From longing looks to full-on intercourse, their dynamic as scene partners never waivers. Zagorodnii impresses in scenes where he is being selfish in his relationship with Sergey while protecting him from serious consequences. In one scene, he is all but found out and essentially doesn’t speak as his home is searched. Using just his eyes he creates a sense of terror that invokes both what he is going through at that moment and the history of his circumstance. Prior, on the other hand, is bold and outspoken when he speaks to Zagorodnii. In a dinner scene late in the film, he delivers a suspenseful response to a simple question with a moving, tear-filled restraint.
Both leads are natural talents, but Rebane also shines in this regard, getting the absolute most out of his performance. Be they minor or major roles, everyone is on the same page in Firebird. Perhaps it’s due to the nature of this story being true, but nothing feels out of place in this depiction of 1970s Russia. Similarly, there is no painstaking effort to invoke The Beatles or the invention of the microwave as a way of telling the audience when the film is set. Rebane trusts viewers enough to know where to keep the camera pointed at all times. Most excitingly, because Roman flies jets, Firebird boasts a few gorgeous shots of them taking off. Mixing CGI and real planes was a stroke of brilliance. But cutting to two jets taking off during a sex scene with the leads is borderline trite in a movie this good.
Firebird is more entertaining than the average Russian period piece and more subtle than the average LGBTQ romance. The depiction of every character is well thought out and executed. It feels like the entire production was in sync on this one. The film drags early, but other than that there is little that can be held against it. Even though the score leaves a lot on the table and the set design is not stellar, Firebird does not suffer from its lack of spectacular cinematography. It relishes the fact that it is a movie about two men trying to stay in love. A film knowing what it is and knowing what it wants to be are not always the same thing, but the vision delivered in Firebird is one of cohesion and grace.
Firebird is in theaters and on-demand as of April 29. The film is 107 minutes long and is rated R for language and some sexual content.

Our Rating:
3 out of 5 (Good)

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