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The 10 best Tom Clancy games of all time

When choosing the best Tom Clancy game, you will have a lot to do. It’s been over 35 years since Tom Clancy’s name was first printed on the box in 1998. Prior to that, there were games based on his fiction, such as the 1987 Commodore 64 and the Amiga game based on the Red October. I had to draw a line somewhere, so I stuck with the official “Tom Clancy” Ubisoft game on this list.

Various studios working on the Ubisoft and Clancy brands are demonstrating that the series will continue to perform well in 2022. This year I watched Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction and there are two free games in the game. There is also a Division spin. Off with works and works based on Clancy’s poems.

10. Tom Clancy’s final battle

The end of Tom Clancy

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Endwar has deceived us all. Voice commands are still pretty cool, but Ubi has released this Clancy Universe strategy game that is completely voice playable. Frankly, this was a disaster recipe. As the game got confused, frustrated armchair generals around the world began to add more and more powerful curses to their orders. But below that is a beautiful strategy game that drops delicious, well-designed cards. Going back to the pad is far from the ideal solution, but it means you can almost enjoy one of the few RTS games that actually run on the console. .. Before XCOM: Enemy Unknown appeared and everyone admitted defeat.

9. Tom Clancy Division

At first, it feels like the division is trying to do a lot of things, but none of them are perfect. Then the truth is clear to you: it’s destined to have a cover system and a beanie. This episode has always made sense. If you approach with the idea of ​​Destiny, you can have a good time. For example, tackling a loot quest can be a chore, but if not, it’s not. Please do not bring it. Adjust the difficulty according to your friends and your skills. The dark zone is the most unique aspect of the division and acts like a small PvP DayZ option in the middle of the map. Aside from equipment balance issues, meeting another group of agents and treating them as potential allies or enemies is always a particularly tense thrill, knowing they did the same to you. ..

8. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Shadow Wars

Tom Clancy's Shadow War

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Nintendo 3DS is not exactly the strength of the Tom Clancy franchise. It doesn’t have the flashy presentations of the best Sprinter Cell, nor does it have the solid networking features that are perfect for Rainbow Six. In general, shooters have never felt right with Nintendo’s handhelds. However, Ghost Recon Shadow Wars is a Tom Clancy Pantheon monster. Rather than a slow-paced multiplayer shooter, Shadow Wars is a tactical RPG that puts you in a tough battle with a few experts. It easily captures both the flesh tension of a well-performed plot and the live play of a large Ghost Recon game, but as a turn-based XCOM analog. To be honest, these XCOM attributes also appear in ShadowWars. This was Julian Gallop, the last XCOM game creator delivered for Ubisoft.

7. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Vegas

Given the rather niche concept of the R6 Vegas, it’s amazing that Ubi made some games from it. In fact, he is likely to say that the former is better. This setting adds brilliance and charm, and with new gameplay features, it feels like the first Rainbow Six game truly optimized for the console. Refreshed health, a third-person view for blind shooting, and context-dependent squad control (on the cross key) provide non-hardcore players with a slightly more familiar and intense blast experience. It certainly softens the appeal of some series, but everything else is still satisfactorily tough and military. Still, returning the second game to Sin City without actual improvements was probably a bad idea. Will you continue today? I understand, shouldn’t I play Siege instead?

6. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon (2001)

Phantom Discovery (2001)

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Well, the original Ghost Recon hasn’t fully met today’s standards. It’s a pretty slow and pretty ugly game, and tactical shooting doesn’t completely make up for its visual and presentation shortcomings. But at the turn of the millennium, it was the first video game. It didn’t matter that the game was a half-orientation sim, a half-shooter-it’s nicely “real”, has great set pieces, and really rewards patience and clever tactical thinking. Games like Operation Flashpoint and ArmA have reached the peak of painfully slow military shooters, but it was a good side to spoil your special ops side.

5. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Reasoning

Rainbow Six Mining

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Originally known as Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Quarantine, this Rainbow Six Siege spin-off threw a parasitic alien named Archaea into the tactical shooter mix. In the worst case, the game can be repeated, but at best it will scare you. Whether you’re an old-fashioned Clancy Stan or unfamiliar with the world, the team that gets rid of bad ETs with friends as part of REACT (of course, the Rainbow Exogenous Analysis and Containment team) adds a whole new dimension to Clancy. Poetry. ..

4. Tom Clancy’s Sprinter Cell Blame

When it finally surfaced in 2010, it was a new kind of sneak, tattered and hurt by the problematic development cycle. It was first released when Sam Fisher met Jason Bourne, but the final product wasn’t that smooth and “killer.” A “man with a log” was promised, but the aggressive and fast-paced stealth wasn’t what you’d see in the game. The ability to combine the fluid movements around each self-contained scene with the protracted growls of an increasingly horrifying takedown is a lot of fun to play. Sure, the story isn’t the best in the series (despite the pretty memorable scene of forcing a man’s hand on a tree stump with a war knife), but it doesn’t matter if the action is smooth. And don’t forget the incredibly tense cooperation mode that culminates in ending your friends before he kills you.

3. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands

Ghost Recon Wildlands

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

If you’ve played Mercenaries games, you’ll remember the thrill of tracking high-value targets within a safe range and cleverly neutralizing them. Or summon a huge aerial fuel bomb throughout the building. Ghost Recon Wildlands takes a step back from ammo drops and lets you sing all about these surgical open world strikes. A team of four (with cooperation or AI buddies) can sneak into drug cartel facilities, kick doors with explosives and machine guns, and do all the dirty work on nearby hills with a reliable rifle. .. Sniper. Wildlands is one of the most fun things you can have in Clancy poetry if you can put together a complete list.

2. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

Rainbow Six Siege High Caliber Update will be available on November 30th

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Siege received some boring reviews and captivated a smaller audience than Ubi wanted, but the time and the amazing set formed around it prove the genius of this tense and candid shooter. .. The basic mod (Siege) is very finely tuned and the map is very economically designed to create a very simple and beautiful game. 5 vs 5 – One team defends and the other infiltrates. Gadgets and gadget arrays add flavor to what is essentially a battle of wisdom and wisdom between two teams. But Siege’s greatest strength is the gasping and cheers of fellow spectators, with the potential for a spectacular 5 to 1 final that wipes out the entire opposition of the lone survivors of the struggling team. is. These are the rarest moments in the game and are really interesting experiences.

1. Tom Clancy’s Cellular Chaos Theory

There are several reasons why chaos theory is the best clancy game. To get started, this Maximum Clancy-Plot focuses on shadowy global conflicts that could plunge the world into a new war. It’s a dark and tense game with enough plots and settings to engross you, and the protagonist Sam Fisher (albeit old) is more agile than ever to give the game a sleepless night. I have enough smart devices. James Bond Q. However, the protagonist of the show is Spies vs Mercs mode. This is probably the most sublime, tense and exciting multiplayer mode I’ve ever experienced. The spy’s third-party perspective balances relative vulnerabilities, but the lethality of mercenaries seems to be fairly limited from the first-person perspective. Spies vs Mercs is more responsible for gasping, fighting, and sweating liters per game than any other online experience. truth. work. Unfortunately, the fun visuals of the game are a bit old, and Spies vs Mercs can no longer be played on the console (the server is down), but it’s still the highest level of any Clancy game to date.

There are also division movies, so Upcoming video game movies After 2022.


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The 10 best Tom Clancy games of all time

When you’re choosing the best Tom Clancy games, you’ve got plenty to work with. There have been more than 35 since that Tom Clancy name was first stamped on a box in 1998. Even before that, there were games based on his fiction, including a Commodore 64 and Amiga game in 1987 based on The Hunt for Red October. We’re sticking to the official, “Tom Clancy’s” titled Ubisoft games for this list, because we had to draw a line somewhere.
It’s a testament to Ubisoft and the various studios that have worked on the Clancy brand that the series is still going strong in 2022. This year we’ve had Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction, and there are two free-to-play titles in the works based in the Clancy-verse and a The Division spin-off in the works too. 
10. Tom Clancy’s Endwar

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Endwar made fools of us all. When voice commands were still achingly cool, Ubi dished up this strategy game from the Clancy universe that you could play entirely vocally. Obviously that was a recipe for disaster, as frustrated armchair generals all over the world started inserting increasingly strong swears into their orders when the game fudged it all up. However, underneath all that is a fine strategy game with some delightfully well-designed maps to scrap in. Reverting to pad is a far from ideal solution, but it means you get to almost enjoy one of the few RTS titles that actually worked on console. Y’know, before XCOM: Enemy Unknown showed up and everyone just conceded defeat.
9. Tom Clancy’s The Division

At first, The Division feels like it’s trying to do a lot of different things and not quite excelling at any of them. Then the truth dawns upon you: this is Destiny with a cover system and beanie caps. The Division makes so much more sense after that point, and if you approach it with that Destiny mindset, you’re bound to have a good time: for instance, grinding through missions for loot can be a chore, but not if you bring along friends and tweak the difficulty to match your skills. The Dark Zone is by far The Division’s most unique aspect, playing like a little PvP-optional DayZ right in the middle of the map. Gear balance issues aside, it’s still a uniquely tense thrill to stumble on another group of agents and size them up as potential allies or enemies, knowing they’re doing the same to you.
8. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Shadow Wars

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
The Nintendo 3DS is not ideally suited to the strengths of any Tom Clancy series. No fancy presentation like the best Splinter Cells, no robust networking features to truly suit Rainbow Six, and shooters in general have never felt great on Nintendo’s handhelds. Ghost Recon Shadow Wars, however, is a freak in the Tom Clancy pantheon. Rather than a slow-paced multiplayer shooter, Shadow Wars is a tactics RPG whose bite-sized skirmishes place you in taut standoffs with a handful of specialists. It handily captures both the succulent tension of a well-executed plan and the brute theatricality of full scale Ghost Recon games, but as a turn-based XCOM-alike. Those XCOM qualities come to Shadow Wars honestly too; it was the last game XCOM creator Julian Gollop turned in for Ubisoft.
7. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Vegas

Given the rather niche concept of R6 Vegas, it’s amazing that Ubi squeezed a couple of games out of it. In fact, it’s rather telling that the first of them was the best. While the setting provides the glitz and glamour, the fresh gameplay features make this feel like the first Rainbow Six title truly optimised for console. Regenerating health, a third-person view for blind-firing, and context sensitive squad commands (on the d-pad) all make for a shooty-bang-bang experience that’s a little more sympathetic to the less hardcore player. While this undoubtedly softens the series’ appeal for some, the whole thing is still tough and military enough to satisfy. Again, though, it was probably a poor idea to bring the second game back to the city of sin without any real improvements. Does it hold up today? Well, kinda, but shouldn’t you be playing Siege instead?
6. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon (2001)

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Ok, so, the original Ghost Recon doesn’t really hold up by today’s standards. It’s a rather slow, rather ugly game where the tactical shooting doesn’t quite make up for the visual and presentation shortcomings. But back at the turn of the millennium, this was primo-PC gaming. Didn’t matter that the game is half orienteering sim, half shooter – it’s wonderfully ‘authentic’, has some excellent set-pieces, and genuinely rewards patience and smart tactical thinking. Games like Operation Flashpoint and ArmA pushed the painfully-slow military shooter to their zenith, but this was the acceptable face of indulging your spec-ops side.
5. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Extraction

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
Originally titled Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Quarantine, this Rainbow Six Siege spin-off threw some parasitic aliens called Archæans into the tactical shooter mix. In its worst moments, the game can get repetitive, but in its best moments, it will scare the bejesus out of you. Whether you’re an old-school Clancy stan or new to his world,  taking down evil ETs with your friends as part of the REACT (that’s Rainbow Exogenous Analysis and Containment Team, obviously) squad adds a whole new dimension to the Clancy-verse. 
4. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Conviction

This was a new breed of sneaking when it finally appeared, battered and bruised from a troubled development cycle, in 2010. Originally pitched as Sam Fisher meets Jason Bourne, the end product wasn’t quite as free-flowing and ‘murder-a-man-with-a-newspaper’ as promised, but the aggressive, fast-paced stealth was unlike anything seen in games. The ability to string together takedowns, increasingly terrifying the remaining grunts, in fluid motions around each self-contained stage just feels so, so good to play. Ok, the story isn’t the finest in the series (despite the rather memorable scene where you forcefully attach a man’s hand to a tree-stump with your combat knife), but when the action is this smooth that barely matters. And let’s not forget the fantastically tense co-op mode, which climaxes in the order to terminate your buddy before they kill you.
3. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
If you ever played the Mercenaries games, you remember the fun of tracking down high-value targets in secure compounds and expertly neutralizing them. Or just calling down a massive fuel-air bomb on the whole premises. Ghost Recon Wildlands backs off from the air-dropped ordnance in favor of making everything about those open-world surgical strikes sing. Teams of four (either in co-op or with AI buddies) can sneak into drug cartel facilities for silent takedowns, smash down the gates with explosives and machine guns, or do all the dirty work from a nearby hilltop with their trusty sniper rifles. If you can get a full squad together, Wildlands is some of the most fun you’ll ever have in the Clancy-verse.
2. Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

(Image credit: Ubisoft)
While Siege received several middling reviews and attracted a smaller audience than Ubi might have hoped, time and the amazing communities that have built up around it will testify to the brilliance of this tense, intimate shooter. The core mode – Siege – is so finely tuned, the maps so economically designed, they create a game beautiful through its violent simplicity. Five versus five – one team defends, the other infiltrates. A sprinkling of gadgets and tools add flavour to what is, essentially, a battle of wits and smarts between two teams. But the absolute best thing about Siege is the potential for an epic five vs one finish, with the sole survivor on a struggling team wiping out the entire opposition force by themselves, to the sound of gasps and cheers from their spectating comrades. Those moments are the rarest of gaming gems, and they make this a precious experience, indeed.
1. Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Chaos Theory

There are so many reasons why Chaos Theory is the best Clancy game out there. For starters, it’s maximum Clancy – the plot focuses on a global shadow conflict that threatens to plunge the world into a new war. It’s a dark, tense game, with enough plot twists and set-pieces to keep you gripped, and leading man Sam Fisher is more agile (despite being older) than ever, packing enough smart gadgets to give James Bond’s Q sleepless nights. However, the star of the show is the Spies vs Mercs mode, which is the most sublime, taut, and thrilling multiplayer you’re likely to experience. There’s something so wonderfully balanced about it – the third-person perspective of the spies offsetting their relative fragility, while the lethality of the mercs feels sensibly restrained by the first-person view. Spies vs Mercs is responsible for more gasps, fist-pumps, and liters of sweat shed per game than any other online experience. Fact. Ish. Sadly, the game’s delightful visuals have aged a little, and Spies vs Mercs can no longer be played on console (the servers have been switched off), but this remains the high-watermark for all Clancy games to date.
There’s a The Division movie coming too, so check out all the upcoming video game movies for 2022 and beyond.

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